Harvest Monday July 24, 2017

Welcome to Harvest Monday, where we celebrate all things harvest related. We’re having a hot summer here this year, and last week was the hottest week we’ve had so far. The high temperatures got over 100°F a couple of days, and the high humidity made the heat index reach 120°F. Despite all that, the garden is doing well, all things considered. And yesterday we finally got some much needed rain, almost two inches of it. Heat lovers like eggplant are happy for sure, and I got harvests of both Patio Baby and Fairy Tale last week. The first big fruits are setting on too, so we should be enjoying even more in the days ahead. These little ones got grilled as a side dish.

Fairy Tale and Patio Baby eggplant

Fairy Tale and Patio Baby eggplant

The tomatoes seem to be loving the heat too, and I found our first ripe slicers of the season on Friday. Better Boy is one of my old standbys, while it’s my first time growing Chef’s Choice Pink. The first big tomatoes are always a special thing for me, and these called for a BLT on some homemade whole wheat bread. Chef’s Choice Pink had a little catfacing, but still tasted great. I even managed to pluck a few leaves from the summer lettuce plants to go on the sandwich. It’s always a challenge here to have tomatoes and lettuce at the same time.

Better Boy(top) and Chef's Choice Pink(bottom) tomatoes

Better Boy(top) and Chef’s Choice Pink(bottom) tomatoes

Chef's Choice Pink tomato

Chef’s Choice Pink tomato

Another tomato worth mentioning is Sunpeach, which is a deep pink and slightly elongated cherry. This one is a sister variety to the ever popular Sun Gold, and was recommended to me by a local market grower who found it was not only tasty and productive but also didn’t split and crack like Sun Gold. I have to agree, and a little digging found there are more similar tomatoes from the same breeder (Tokita seeds), including Sunchocola, Suncherry, Sungreen and Sunlemon. I can see me trying some of these next year. Meanwhile, Sunpeach is a keeper, and I want to experiment with dehydrating it when I get more of them.

Sunpeach tomatoes

Sunpeach tomatoes

I pulled the last of the spring planted radishes last week so I could work up the bed for replanting. The last ones standing were a daikon type called Alpine. The largest one weighed almost two pounds, and the others would have gotten larger too if I had thinned them farther apart. It’s almost time to sow the seeds for fall radishes, and Alpine will be back again for sure. The spring planting gave me over 12 pounds of them, which has kept us well supplied and let me stock the frig with plenty of kkakdugi (radish kimchi) and radish pickles.

Alpine radishes

Alpine radishes

The pole beans are coming on like gangbusters now. I harvested a couple of pounds of them on Friday, with Fortex, Musica, Early Riser, Gold Marie and Trionfo Violetto all making an appearance. I got another two pounds plus yesterday, and I have started freezing them for later use.

pole bean harvest

pole bean harvest

The Rattlesnake beans are known for loving the heat and humidity. These beans have speckled/striped pods, and can be used either as a snap or dry bean. I harvest ours at the snap stage, where they are tender and stringless. I did a variety spotlight on this one back in 2013, and it remains one of my favorite beans.

Rattlesnake beans

Rattlesnake beans

Also showing up was a newcomer called Withner’s White Cornfield bean, an Indiana heirloom I got from Adaptive Seeds. Cornfield beans in general are vining types that are planted in the cornfield and allowed to vine up the corn. The long flat pods are stringless and tender, and the vines are quite vigorous.

Withner's White Cornfield bean

Withner’s White Cornfield bean

The blackberries are winding down. It has been a so-so year for them, and no doubt they are not liking the hot and dry conditions. We haven’t irrigated the plants, since we have plenty for our needs. If the dry conditions persist though I may give them some water to encourage new cane growth for next year’s crop. The size has held up fairly well despite the dry weather. It’s all Apache berries in the below photo.

Apache blackberries

Apache blackberries

The broccoli plants are holding on, and gave us another flush of side shoots last week. I’ll pull the plants in a couple of weeks as soon as I have the fall kale transplants ready to go in. I’ve harvested over 12 pounds of it too, which is pretty good for me from the spring planting which usually struggles once the heat of summer arrives.

broccoli side shoots

broccoli side shoots

And last but not least I cut a couple more of the Tromba D’Albenga squash, one of which had managed to get stuck growing through the garden fencing. I used that one to make a crustless zucchini quiche yesterday for lunch. Or was it a frittata? I never know what to call some of these egg dishes, not that it really matters as long as we enjoy eating them.

tromboncino squash

tromboncino squash

I sliced the squash thinly on a mandolin and then cooked it and some chopped shallots in the skillet for a few minutes before adding an egg, cheese and basil mixture and popping it in the oven to finish cooking. I used the Corsican basil for this dish, fresh picked from the garden.

tromboncino crustless quiche

tromboncino crustless quiche

Harvest Monday is a day to show off your harvests, how you are saving your harvest, or how you are using your harvest. If you have a harvest you want to share, add your name and blog link to Mr Linky below. And be sure and check out what everyone is harvesting!

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10 Responses to Harvest Monday July 24, 2017

  1. Our blackberries and climbing beans are just getting going as yours wind down. I like the look of that ‘omelette’ I wouldn’t have thought of using squash like that. We had something similar but with torn chard leaves last week.
    Susan Garrett recently posted…C is for cucumberMy Profile

  2. Will - Eight Gate Farm - NH says:

    Terrific harvests, Dave. The eggplants are so cute! It’s very interesting to read about the Sun Gold relatives. I’d like to read how the Sunpeach works out over the season, like blight resistance and so forth. And that’s a great haul of beans, again with so many interesting varieties.

  3. Mike R says:

    The Better Boy is a good sized slicer, but the Chef’s Choice makes them look small by comparison. Can’t believe you are still getting some broccoli. The White Cornfield bean is a handsome flat bean. I’ve never heard of it, and I’m from Indiana!

  4. maryhysong says:

    I sure wish it wouldn’t erase my comment when the captcha fails! lovely harvest as usual.
    maryhysong recently posted…Harvest MondayMy Profile

  5. Phuong says:

    Isn’t it wonderful when tomatoes start to really come in, with such a difference between store bought and homegrown they’re the main reason I garden. And I bet your homemade bread put the BLT on a whole other level.

    I’m going to try raw packing tomatoes in their own juice and pressure canning them today. And there’s a bread and butter zucchini pickle I want to give a try, as well as a sweet green tomato pickle.
    Phuong recently posted…An Epic Year in the Vegetable GardenMy Profile

  6. Mary N. says:

    Dave, I agree with you about the Alpine radishes. Your biggest root is about double the size of mine. I discovered that if I loped off the flower stalk while it was still short, the root would stay tender and keep growing.
    Mary N. recently posted…7/24/2017 Home Garden Tour & HarvestMy Profile

  7. Gorgeous tomatoes, yum. And I really must try growing tromboncino one year. I had a funny shaped winter squash one time, where it was growing through a bit of trellis.
    Lou@rainbowchard recently posted…Harvest Monday – summer pickingsMy Profile

  8. Margaret says:

    That frittata (quiche??) looks delicious! Some beautiful harvests – very envious of those tomatoes! We don’t have a single ripe one yet and with this rainy weather, blight has reared it’s ugly head so it looks like it may be a very short season.
    Margaret recently posted…Garden Project of 2017 – The SolutionMy Profile

  9. Michelle says:

    Wow, what a great week of harvests! Those tomatoes look so good and the Withner’s bean looks really good too. I’m still waiting for the first bean, actually I’m still waiting for the bean plants to even bloom. I’m surprised that the broccoli is still hanging in there in the summer heat. I wonder if the blackberries are a bit tastier for the heat and water stress?

    No post from me this Monday, I was off for a few days bagging another “fourteener”.
    Michelle recently posted…Harvest Monday – July 17, 2017My Profile

  10. Lexa says:

    Dave- I certainly do not envy your heat. I can not imagine what a heat index of 120 even feels like. It would wilt this Pacific Northwest girl!Per usual, you have a wonderful harvest. I was glad to see you trying a variety from Adaptive Seed. They are just 20 miles up the road from me. Last Saturday I got to hear a talk at our local nursery from Andrew, one of the owners, speaking on Fall Vegetables.A great couple and a great catalog. I am growing their Titus bush dry bean this year. Hopefully I will have something to share on harvest Monday down the road.
    Lexa recently posted…Music Garlic Harvest and the Last of the Sweet PeasMy Profile

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