Harvest Monday November 14, 2016

Welcome to Harvest Monday, where we celebrate all things harvest related. I’ve been busy in the garden lately, digging up plants for overwintering indoors and harvesting the last of the warm season veggies before freezing weather hits us. I have lots of things to blog about, but it seems like I run out of time and energy after I get done outside! Oh well, I suppose I have all winter to catch up inside. We had our first hard freeze on Sunday morning, and that will put an end to the summer veggies. Meanwhile I’m still dealing with the harvests, including more peppers and eggplant. I stripped the plants on Wednesday, and lined everyone up for the below group photo. There’s a few tomatoes in there as well.

last harvest of peppers and eggplant

last harvest of peppers and eggplant

A few things are worth noting including the Aleppo peppers, which I dried to make into pepper flakes. My one plant was a shy producer, but then it wasn’t in the best of locations either. We’ll see what it tastes like before I decide if I plant it again in 2017. These are a strain of the peppers grown in Syria and Turkey for the spice trade, and I got the seed from Ford’s Fiery Foods and Plants.

Aleppo peppers

Aleppo peppers

There’s no doubt about Aji Angelo coming back though. Ever since I got seeds for this one from Michelle (From Seed To Table) back in 2013, it has become one of my favorite peppers. There’s over 2.5 pounds of them in the below photo, and all came from a single three year old plant. The plant is now in a container, and sitting in our basement. I will try and get a fourth year from it next year. I am fermenting most of these, enough to fill a quart jar, and I will turn them into hot sauce and pepper flakes.

Aji Angelo peppers

Aji Angelo peppers

I also made a sweep of the brassica patch, harvesting things I didn’t want to get frozen. There’s a couple heads of Little Jade napa cabbage (3 lbs), 2 heads of Pixie cabbage (2 lbs), some Kossak kohlrabi (about 6 lbs) and a head of Melissa savoy cabbage (2 lbs). Much of that is going to get fermented, and it looks like I need to share that in a future post. I also cut almost a pound of broccoli side shoots. It has been a pretty good year here for this group, and we have had plenty to eat for sure. Turning some into fermented goodies will keep us eating them well into winter, if not longer. Digging into a jar of sauerkraut or kimchi in January is my idea of a Happy Meal!

assortment of cabbage and kohlrabi

assortment of cabbage and kohlrabi

I continue to cut lettuce as needed. That’s Baby Oakleaf and Jester in the below photo. I think these wound up in a taco salad. The lettuce is protected by a cold frame and should handle the freezes just fine, at least until it gets a bit colder. It got down to 23°F at the weather station last night, which is mounted on the gate to the main garden, but it was no doubt warmer under the protection of the cold frames which are sitting next to the greenhouse.

Jester and Baby Oakleaf lettuce

Jester and Baby Oakleaf lettuce

Jester has turned into a new favorite of mine. It’s a crispleaf variety from Wild Garden Seeds. The big leaves are not only colorful but tender and mild tasting, and great for sandwiches. I plucked the two outer leaves in the below photo and left the plants to keep growing.

leaves of Jester lettuce

leaves of Jester lettuce

I pulled a few radishes last week too. The blocky ones are Alpine, and the long skinny one is Miyashige. The Miyashige needs more time to size up, though I’m not sure how much more growing it will do this late in the season. I used some of the Alpine in a stir fry, and some to make a batch of radish kimchi (Kkakdugi).

Alpine and Miyashige radishes

Alpine and Miyashige radishes

I also pulled a few turnips from my August planting. It’s a mix of Oasis and Hakurei, and I cooked the leaves for a side dish and used the roots to make a batch of sauerruben (turnip kraut). The leaves on these two varieties are smooth and tender, and the roots make a fairly mild tasting kraut when fermented. Of course they’re also tasty raw or cooked.

Oasis and Hakurei turnips

Oasis and Hakurei turnips

I saved my most exciting harvest for last. Early this year I potted up pieces of ginger and turmeric root I got from our local Aihua International Market. I planted them out behind the greenhouse back in May, where they have been growing ever since. With freezing weather forecast last week, it was time to dig them up. The turmeric did not make anything big enough to eat, so I potted up the two plants with hopes of overwintering them indoors and setting out again next spring. But the ginger did so much better, and I got my first ever harvest of ginger! I’ve already made plans to grow more of it next year. It was easy to grow, requiring no real effort after planting other than an occasional watering.

fresh dug ginger

fresh dug ginger

I was inspired to grow it by Norma (Garden to Wok). She has had success growing it both in the ground and in containers, so I figured it should do well for me here – and it did! Some of the ginger wound up in a stir fry, along with our eggplant, peppers, daikon radish, cabbage and garlic. And I used a small bit of one ‘hand’ to make a batch of gari (pickled sushi ginger). It has a different taste than mature ginger, milder I guess, and it is more tender and less fibrous. There was a little over a pound of it after I cleaned and trimmed it up.

ginger root

ginger root

My wife and I love sushi ginger, and I used a recipe from Tsukemono: Japanese Pickling Recipes by Ikuko Hisamatsu for Shin-shoga Amazu-zuke (Young Ginger in Sweet Vinegar). I scrubbed the ginger clean, then thinly sliced it using my Benriner mandolin. I blanched the ginger in boiling water for 30 seconds, then made a pickling brine from rice vinegar, sugar and salt to pour over the ginger. This online recipe comes pretty close to the one in the book. It isn’t really, really young ginger, but it isn’t mature yet either, and the skin mostly came off when I scrubbed it with a veggie brush. I may pickle some more of it, using a different recipe and some umeboshi vinegar.

ginger after cleanup

ginger after cleanup

In the meantime, I am enjoying this batch, which I have been eating as a snack. I may have to get some take-out sushi and bring home to enjoy with this soon!

slice of pickled ginger

slice of pickled ginger

Harvest Monday is a day to show off your harvests, how you are saving your harvest, or how you are using your harvest. If you have a harvest you want to share, add your name and blog link to Mr Linky below. And be sure and check out what everyone is harvesting!



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13 Responses to Harvest Monday November 14, 2016

  1. That ginger looks great – I wonder if a pot in the greenhouse would work for us,
    I think we must be the only veg growing bloggers in the world not to grow chillies!
    Susan Garrett recently posted…Going undergroundMy Profile

  2. Susie says:

    Ginger, how wonderful! I have thought about growing that often, glad to see it worked out well for you. And what a great and big batch of peppers from the cleanup, so many varieties.

    I bought a pickle pipe and fermented a mason jar full of Hungarian Hot Wax as that happened to be the pepper I had available at the time. It is delicious (and very hot after over a month fermenting). Thanks for the inspiration!
    Susie recently posted…Harvest Monday: November 14, 2016My Profile

  3. Michelle says:

    Aji Angelo has been an amazing performer in your garden! It’s sad to see the last of the summer veggies. And it sounds like a lot of the brassicas don’t like your freezing temperatures either. I am so impressed with your ginger harvest. It makes me want to give it a more serious effort next year. I love young ginger, I used to buy when I lived in the SF bay area, but haven’t found a source for it around here.
    Michelle recently posted…Harvest Monday – November 14, 2016My Profile

    • Dave says:

      The brassicas can take some freezing, but I didn’t trust the forecasts. And I’m glad I didn’t, because it got much colder here than predicted.

  4. Mike R says:

    Quite the November harvest, Dave. I love the flavor of ginger, especially in winter, when a warm Vernor’s ginger ale, the original aged in oak barrels, was the best thing to drink after a day outdoors.
    Mike R recently posted…Monday November 14My Profile

  5. That is amazing that you are growing ginger. Congrats for an initial harvest. You’re a long ways from the tropics! You must fall into bed at night with all the garden activity. The variety of your harvests in November show good planning in late summer.

  6. Margaret says:

    Congrats on the ginger – what a huge root! You have some pretty wonderful final harvests there – that first photo is such a great reminder of our harvests only a month or so ago. It’s always a busy time when that first frost/freeze happens.
    Margaret recently posted…Harvest Monday – November 14, 2016My Profile

  7. Amazing, am so impressed with the ginger! It’s a nice lot of last peppers too. You really make the most of your harvests, a great inspiration.
    Lou@rainbowchard recently posted…Harvest Monday – appleyMy Profile

  8. Jay says:

    I must say that was a very good last harvest before the freeze. In looking at that ginger it gives me the idea to try it next year. Always have to try something new!
    Jay recently posted…Harvest Monday; November 13, 2016My Profile

  9. Mark Willis says:

    Oh wow! Home-grown ginger! I’m very impressed. When it is young and fresh it is a very different thing to the often dried-up and shrivelled stuff sold in the shops. Sounds like your larder is full of good stuff for Winter consumption, Dave.

  10. Such diverse harvests this late in the year, great job!

  11. Kathy says:

    What an amazing harvest of ginger, Dave! Next year I shall be adding it to my list for sure and maybe we can have enough to pickle

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