Monday Recap: Hot and Sweet

It’s pepper season here at HA, with both hot and sweet varieties making appearances in the harvest basket. I’ve been eagerly waiting to get enough ripe hot ones to make hot sauce, and last Friday was the day. In the below photo there’s several varieties. The red ones are Joe’s Long Cayenne, Maule’s Red Hot and Cayennetta. There’s two Aji Golden at the top, and the orange ones at the bottom are Hot Happy Yummy.

hot peppers for hot sauce

hot peppers for hot sauce

It was a little less than a pound of peppers all told. I split them up and used some for a batch of No Rooster Chili Garlic Sauce, and the rest for Basic Fermented Hot Sauce. I have plenty of the fermented hot sauce left from last year that’s still tasty, but I was out of the chili garlic sauce and ready to make a fresh batch. I enjoy making hot sauces, and when you use a mix of homegrown peppers you can control the heat level as well as the flavor profile. It will be a couple of weeks before the fermented hot sauce is ready, but the chili garlic sauce was destined for a baked potato I had last night for dinner.

peppers fermenting for hot sauce

peppers fermenting for hot sauce

The sweet peppers coming in were a mix of Jimmy Nardello, Orange Blaze and Glow. Glow is a small orange bell type that’s not as orange as Orange Blaze but is a tad bigger. Both the orange ones did well here last year, and Jimmy is always a favorite.

Jimmy Nardello and Glow sweet peppers

Jimmy Nardello and Glow sweet peppers

We grill quite a few of the Jimmy Nardello peppers. That treatment really seems to bring out the flavor, and it makes a quick and easy side dish. The below photo shows them joining up with ravioli topped with ‘butternut’ sauce. I whipped up the sauce using frozen Violina Rugosa squash puree from last year. First I cooked a little chopped onion in olive oil until soft, then added a bit of sliced garlic along with the winter squash puree. I cooked it just long enough for the flavors to meld, then I threw in few leaves of finely chopped sage before serving. The ravioli was stuffed with cheese and spinach and came from a recent trip to Costco. We’ve made ravioli before but it is a lot of work, and I can’t honestly say our homemade version was any better than the store-bought.

grilled Jimmy Nardello peppers with butternut ravioli

grilled Jimmy Nardello peppers with butternut ravioli

I harvested several of the Italian eggplants last week, enough to make a main course dish with them. I wanted to combine them with quinoa and loosely followed a recipe I found online that mixed the eggplant with quinoa, spinach and feta cheese. I have no photos of the dish but did get the eggplant to pose for me before it was cubed and roasted in the oven. It’s either Nadia or Galine or a mix of both varieties. Both do well for me, and I can’t hardly tell the difference in them, so I need to choose one and drop the other from my growing list.

Nadia and/or Galine eggplant

Nadia and/or Galine eggplant

Most of the tomatoes have slowed to a halt but a few of the cherry types are still producing. It’s mostly Mexico Midget in the below photo, with a few Sun Golds mixed in. The o/p Mexico Midget is still producing while the hybrid Super Sweet 100 is not doing much. That has been noted for next year’s planning, and Mexico Midget may well be the only red cherry type I grow. The larger Juliet and Golden Rave tomatoes are still producing here too.

cherry tomatoes for salad

cherry tomatoes for salad

Those tomatoes joined up with the newly rejuvenated pole beans when I made a batch of Green Bean and Bulgur Salad with Walnuts. I love this salad and it made a nice side dish with roasted chicken (which also came from Costco). I can barely buy a raw chicken for $4.99 but for that much this one came already cooked!

Green Bean and Bulgur Salad with Walnuts

Green Bean and Bulgur Salad with Walnuts

I made a batch of pita bread last week to replenish our supply we usually keep in the freezer. I try and plan it so we can enjoy some of the pitas while they are fresh, and this time they are going to serve as a crust for pizza tonight. I made one batch of Whole Grain Spelt Pita Bread and one of Whole Wheat Sourdough. We tend to use these more like flat bread than pocket bread, so I typically roll them out as large as I can. I made the whole wheat ones out of freshly ground White Sonora wheat, and this heirloom soft wheat variety was a joy to roll out for the flat bread. I need to make some flour tortillas with it some day.

stack of fresh baked pita bread

stack of fresh baked pita bread

The winter squash vines continue to bloom and set fruit. That’s a pair of Seminole in the below photo. I only got one of them last year, but it was so tasty I am really looking forward to however many we get this year. I am careful not to count my squashes too soon, because there are just too many things that can go wrong when it comes to gardening! At least these two are hanging on the inside of the garden fence, where hungry critters can’t get to them.

pair of Seminole squash on the vine

pair of Seminole squash on the vine

And I am breaking in the new compost bins (aka the Brown Gold Roadster) with a hot steamy pile of compost. The temp in the middle of the pile has gotten up to 145°F in less than a week. I layered freshly pulled weeds with the partially composted organic material from the old bins, and it heated right on up. I may turn it over into the 2nd bin in a few days if I have the energy, and then again I might not. It will likely be ready to use by next spring whether I mess with it or not, so perhaps you can guess which course of action will likely be taken! At any rate, the pile is hot, and that is sweet to me.

compost thermometer

compost thermometer

To hear what other gardeners are doing right, and see some of the fruits of their labors, visit Daphne’s Dandelions where Daphne hosts Harvest Mondays.

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19 Responses to Monday Recap: Hot and Sweet

  1. Jenny says:

    Very nice peppers! Do you have have cross pollination issue where sweet peppers turn hot if they’re too close to hot-varieties?
    Jenny recently posted…Tomato OverloadMy Profile

  2. Dave's SFG says:

    Nice haul of chilies. I would try your hot sauce recipe again but it doesn’t look like I will be getting any hot peppers (unless I use the Padron). Last year the ferment molded pretty badly. The grilled Nardellos look good and is something I will try this week since I have a big batch of those.
    Dave’s SFG recently posted…Harvest Monday 31 August 2015My Profile

  3. Will - Eight Gate Farm - NH says:

    What a nice assortment of peppers. And the chili-garlic sauce looks yummy, though I don’t think I’d eat it on date night.

  4. Susie says:

    Everything looks so healthy! I was going to make chili garlic sauce yesterday but decided I’d make better use of a hot sauce so made my own version. A great way to use up peppers. The bean walnut dish looks wonderful and what a great idea to make a pasta sauce with the squash puree!
    Susie recently posted…Harvest Monday: August 31My Profile

  5. Margaret says:

    Those pitas look so delicious! I simply love making bread but with the kids (and everything else!), it’s just hard to do that more than once a month or so.

    I would love to make some hot sauce this year. I just looked at your old post & Liz’s post as well & it seems fairly simple. My only concern is that I’m not sure how many more ripe chilies I’ll be harvesting as the weather starts to get cooler. I also don’t use a whole lot of chili sauce either, so storage would be an issue – have you determined how long a chili-garlic sauce like that keeps in the fridge for?
    Margaret recently posted…Harvest Monday – August 31, 2015My Profile

    • Dave says:

      I honestly don’t know how long the chili garlic sauce keeps. The commercial ones usually have preservatives, which helps them keep a long time if refrigerated. I did make a batch last year with fermented peppers, which should keep longer, but I do like the flavor of the fresh (unfermented) sauce better.

      It is time consuming to bake bread for sure. I usually make a double batch of the pitas when I make them. They do freeze well. For that matter we freeze rolls, buns and bread too.

  6. Daphne says:

    I’m usually like that with my compost. It is going to take a while before it is done, so I don’t bother to do any more work than necessary on it.
    Daphne recently posted…Harvest Monday, 31 August 2015My Profile

  7. Do the Jimmy Nardello have many seeds? Those might be a good sweet option for us in the future, to go with the King of the North and Carmen.

    It’s fun trying lots of different pepper plants.
    A.J. Coltrane recently posted…Container Garden Update — August 30, 2015My Profile

  8. Melissa says:

    Excellent hauls you’re bringing in! How are those Hot Happy Yummy peppers doing? Have the seeds stabilized? It’s been a few years since we did that little experiment for you and I’m sure I’m out of the loop 😉

    • Dave says:

      Thanks Melissa! The Sweet Happy Yummys are almost stable, but the hot ones are proving more difficult. I hope to get them there before I am old(er) and gray(er)!

  9. Norma Chang says:

    I could eat your Green Bean and Bulgur Salad with Walnuts as a vegetarian meal.
    Norma Chang recently posted…Harvest Monday, Auugust 31, 2015 – Figs + Long BeansMy Profile

  10. Lexa says:

    You grow so many wonderful peppers but I have to say, each year when I read Hot Yummy Peppers it makes me smile. And I do love their beautiful orange color. As always, I am extra interested in whats happening in your squash patch. Those Seminoles look really neat and you said that they taste great too. Another variety to add to my wish list!
    Lexa recently posted…End of August HarvestMy Profile

    • Dave says:

      I only harvested one Seminole squash last year. It’s a moschata type, much like a butternut, and I cut it in half and baked it. It was especially tasty, and I was surprised that the skin was edible too.

  11. Michelle says:

    I always find some inspiration from your doings. Grilled Jimmy Nardellos sound great, the Long des Landes peppers I’m growing this year are similar and should be tasty grilled. And the Green Bean & Bulgur salad looks like a winner too. I see we have the same philosophy about compost – it happens.
    Michelle recently posted…Harvest Monday – August 31, 2015My Profile

  12. That Green Bean and Bulgur Salad looks delicious and a perfect treat for all our green beans and tomatoes that won’t stop coming! I love that pita bread you made too. I’ve been using our jalapeno peppers in making bread lately and it’s been a hit at the dinner table. Glad to have found your happy harvest post!

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