Featured Cooking Bean: Good Mother Stallard

This year I am on a mission to cook and eat as many different varieties of beans as possible. This is another in a series about my observations about those beans.

Good Mother Stallard is a dry shelling bean that I have grown for the last two years now. It is a pole bean with a vining habit, and a sturdy support system is advised if you are growing it. The pods turn a creamy white color as they mature, and inside there are 5-6 plump, maroon and white colored beans that can be harvested at the fresh shell or dry bean stage. With our hot humid summer weather, I generally harvest them before they are completely dry, and finish the drying process indoors where conditions are more favorable.

Good Mother Stallard beans

Good Mother Stallard beans

There is not much history available about this great tasting bean. It took a bit of digging to find that they are a family heirloom that was sent to Glenn Drowns at Sand Hill Preservation Center many years ago. The Seed Savers Exchange credits him for introducing this variety to their members back in the early 2000’s, according to their online listing for the bean. I think I first heard about this bean from fellow blogger Lynn at Wood Ridge. She is also a fan of this bean, and you can read her 2010 post on Good Mother Stallard as well.

Good Mother Stallard beans

Good Mother Stallard beans

In the kitchen, the beans lose their vivid colors when cooked, but hold their shape well. In my experience, almost none of them fall apart during cooking. This makes them an excellent soup bean, as well as for salads or pasta dishes.

cooked Good Mother Stallard beans

cooked Good Mother Stallard beans

In the book Heirloom Beans, bean grower extraordinaire Steve Sando of Rancho Gordo says it’s one of the first beans he reaches for in the pantry. I have used this versatile bean in several different soups, including vegetable soup and the bean and barley soup in the below photo. Like most dry beans, they freeze well after cooking, which makes it convenient when you’re in a hurry and don’t have the time to cook up a pot of beans.

bean and barley soup with kale

bean and barley soup with kale

They work well in dishes that might call for a borlotti or cranberry bean, such as the classic Italian Pasta Fagioli. If you look closely in the below photo of my version of Pasta e Fagioli, you can still see some of the markings on the beans even after cooking. Their rich and meaty taste also makes them great on their own as a side dish.

Pasta e Fagioli with Good Mother Stallard beans

Pasta e Fagioli with Good Mother Stallard beans

Seeds for growing this variety are available from several sources in the U.S. including Baker Creek and the Seed Savers Exchange. You can buy the beans for cooking from Rancho Gordo, Elegant Beans and Beyond, and the Seed Savers Exchange. As always, I would love to hear about others experiences with growing or cooking these beans.

Good Mother Stallard beans

Good Mother Stallard beans from 2014 harvest

I hope you have enjoyed this review of the Good Mother Stallard beans, and I will be back soon with another bean review. Until then, Happy Growing (and eating) from Happy Acres!

Shared at Mostly Homemade Mondays, HomeAcre HopFront Porch Friday, Natural Family Friday and Old-Fashioned Friday

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6 Responses to Featured Cooking Bean: Good Mother Stallard

  1. Margaret says:

    Wonderful review! Those look delicious; they’re also huge – I’ve never seen a bean that is so plump & round. I’ll definitely be growing these at some point.
    Margaret recently posted…Starting PeppersMy Profile

  2. Michelle says:

    I do believe that I’ve purchased those beans from Rancho Gordo in the past. I’ve never tried a Rancho Gordo bean that I haven’t liked, the problem is that there are so many to try! And there are so many to grow. Terrific review, it makes me want to try them again.
    Michelle recently posted…Harvest Monday – March 2, 2015My Profile

  3. I like your bean posts. We are working our way through a pot of Mexican chicken, black bean, and corn soup this week. I added kale because we are swimming in it. It made a great soup. Three chicken thighs, an onion, 1 c of dry black beans that were soaked overnight, one can of corn, one can of diced tomatoes, 6 oz of chopped kale, 4 stalks of chopped celery, a qt of chicken broth, and juice of one lime. Seasonings were 1 T chopped garlic, 1/4 tsp chipotle chile, and 1/4 tsp smoked paprika, all cooked in the crockpot.
    Lou Murray’s Green World recently posted…Spring in southern California and a good Harvest Monday on Wed, Feb 24 2015My Profile

    • Dave says:

      That sounds like a great soup Lou! I love black beans, and I have a couple more to try (Black Coco and Black Valentine).

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