Monday Recap: Wintery Mishmash

So far it hasn’t been real bad winter here. We’ve had a few brief cold spells where temperatures got down to near 0°F, which killed off the kale that was unprotected and the arugula that was protected by a cold frame. But other than the five inches of snow we got back in November we haven’t had much frozen precipitation. Which is a good thing, because I am no fan of snow and ice! We got rain yesterday, but it was too warm for snow. A little to the north of here it did snow, and that system is prepared to dump even more on the East Coast. It’s quite a while until spring arrives though, and there’s still plenty of time for snow here.

sweet potatoes for fries

sweet potatoes for fries

We eat a lot of foods from storage this time of year, and one staple is sweet potatoes. We have quite a few left from last season, and one of my favorite treatments is to make oven fries with them. I cut the sweet potatoes (skin and all) into half inch thick strips, then toss them with a little olive oil, sea salt and some of our homemade paprika. I bake them in a 425°F oven for 20-30 minutes until they get a little browned. I think I have come to like the purple ones more than the orange ones prepared this way, and this time I used the Purple sweet potatoes I got from Norma last year along with an orange Beauregard. I sometimes use other spices and herbs to vary the flavor a bit, but I generally keep the seasoning light so I can taste the sweet potatoes themselves.

sweet potato oven fries

sweet potato oven fries

Carrots are becoming a staple here, now that I have figured out (mostly) how to grow them. I pulled the last of the fall crop a couple of weeks ago right before the weather turned frigid again. I wanted to get them out of the ground before it froze up, though as it turned out the cold weather was short-lived and the ground quickly thawed out again. I harvested 35 pounds of them last year from a four foot square bed. The fall harvest won’t last us all winter, but we will sure enjoy them while they last. Bolero has proven to be one of the tastiest varieties I’ve grown so far and I plan on growing it again this year.

Bolero carrots

Bolero carrots

Some of those carrots went into a Golden Lentil Soup I made last week, using Petite Golden Lentils I bought from Purcell Mountain Farms. These split lentils are small and a bright yellow color. I put a few brown lentils next to them for reference in the below photo, so you can see how small they really are.

petite golden lentils

petite golden lentils

I decided to go with a yellow/orange theme for the soup, and sauteed some onions, celery and carrots in olive oil before adding chicken broth, minced garlic and ginger,  and ground turmeric. When the veggies had cooked a bit I added the lentils, plus some chopped cauliflower, salt and pepper and continued cooking. The lentils were done in no time, and I topped the soup with a little chopped cilantro from the greenhouse before serving. The cooked lentils look like little kernels of baby corn in the soup.

Golden Lentil Soup

Golden Lentil Soup

The cilantro from the greenhouse turned out to be the only harvest of the week. The cilantro also went into some pesto I made for dinner one night. I used the pesto along with grilled chicken and veggies in some wraps. I love the cilantro pesto, made with only oil, almonds, and a bit of garlic and salt added. It is truly one of my new favorite things, and I can’t believe it took me so long to try it. It helps that I have lots of fresh homegrown cilantro to make it with. I’ve got lots of parsley in the greenhouse too, but parsley pesto is not what I am craving lately.

cilantro for pesto

cilantro for pesto

Another one of my new favorite things is homemade sauerkraut. I made batches using cabbage, kohlrabi and turnips last fall, and stored them in the refrigerator after the initial fermenting period. I believe they have improved with age, and I can (and often do) eat them by themselves for a quick shot of beneficial bacteria. I made the turnip kraut from the red skinned Tsugaru Scarlet turnips, and they add a lovely color and taste to the milder tasting fermented kohlrabi and cabbage. All three starred on a meatless Reuben sandwich I made last week, using some of our homemade rye bread and Swiss cheese.

assembling the meatless Reuben

assembling the meatless Reuben

I’ve almost finished ordering seeds for the 2015 garden. I’ve already received my orders from Fedco, Johnny’s and Baker Creek, and the ones from Territorial, Totally Tomato and the Seed Savers Exchange are on the way. Seed starting will begin here in about a week, starting with parsley, lettuce, and some other cold weather greens. More on that later! To see what others are harvesting and cooking up, visit Daphne’s Dandelions where Daphne hosts Harvest Mondays.

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8 Responses to Monday Recap: Wintery Mishmash

  1. My family found some purple sweet potatoes at a local fruit stand and tried them. As much as we loved our home grown orange sweet potatoes last year, we think we like the flavor of those purple ones better. I am going to have to get some purple slips for summer planting. I like to see how you are using your store of food.
    crafty_cristy recently posted…Free MulchMy Profile

  2. Margaret says:

    Wow – that is an amazing carrot harvest! Sure puts my 10 lbs. in a 4 x 6 area to shame. I will be growing several varieties next year & changing my harvest timing which, hopefully, will impact – positively! – on my total harvest.

    Your lentil soup looks delicious! I used to hate lentils as a kid – my mom would make the standard brown lentils and serve them plain. Thankfully, I was converted as an adult once I found all the other wonderful varieties (I can eat plainly cooked Puy Lentils by the bowlful!) and techniques/flavouring methods.
    Margaret recently posted…2014 Harvest TallyMy Profile

  3. Barbie says:

    I have found that my favorite sweet potato fries are most definitely the purple ones. They get crisper faster and stay firmer when cooling off….my personal favorite is dusting them with cinnamon and powdered sugar with a touch of cayenne and dipping in a raspberry or blueberry syrup. Oh, heavenly
    Barbie recently posted…Harvest Monday 1.26.15My Profile

  4. Mark Willis says:

    You may not have harvested much, but you seem to have been eating very well! I wouldn’t fight you for the Cilantro – I like the idea of it, but the stuff itself makes me very ill. I have to admire your carrot prowess – 35lbs from a four foot square bed is impressive.
    Mark Willis recently posted…Harvest Monday – 26th Jan 2015My Profile

  5. Michelle says:

    So many yummy things! I’m always amazed at how well we can eat from pantry and freezer stores at this time of year, all the hard work in the garden is definitely worthwhile. What I can’t believe is that I’ve almost run out of cilantro in the garden, there’s usually a forest of it at this time of year but the birds have decimated it. If It weren’t for yards and yards of Agribon, micromesh, bird netting and tulle my garden would be bare! BTW, could you spare some of that rain?
    Michelle recently posted…Harvest Monday – January 26, 2015My Profile

  6. Susie says:

    So many wonderful dishes – getting hungry just reading about your meals! I was just having a discussion with my dad the other day about sweet potato fries – I haven’t made them in a few years but neither of us has found a way to get good crisp fries – they tend to be soft and floppy (but delicious nevertheless). Is that the way it always works or is there a secret I don’t know about? :)
    Susie recently posted…Harvest Monday: January 26, 2015My Profile

    • Dave says:

      I have a hard time getting the orange ones crisp, but the purple sweet potatoes seem to be a bit drier and get a little more crispy. I think that’s one reason I like the purple ones better for fries.

  7. Norma Chang says:

    So glad you like the purple sweet potatoes.
    Norma Chang recently posted…Harvest Monday, February 2, 2015 – Growing Mung Bean Sprouts (Reblogged)My Profile

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