Whole Grain Spelt Pita Bread

Home baked pita bread has been a staple on our menu for several years now. The tasty flatbreads are great for wraps, pocket bread, pita crisps and pizza crust. And they freeze well too, making it possible to have them on short notice whenever we want them. As a result, we pretty much always have some on hand.

Whole Grain Spelt Pita Bread (click on any image to enlarge)

Whole Grain Spelt Pita Bread (click on any image to enlarge)

My original recipe for Whole Wheat Pita Bread calls for half whole wheat flour and half unbleached flour. Those pitas are great for those who want a lighter taste, especially when you use milder tasting white whole wheat flour. And for those who like the taste of sourdough and whole wheat, my Whole Wheat Sourdough Pita Bread recipe combines the two for a more full flavored, naturally leavened whole grain pita bread.

Nutrimill grain mill

Nutrimill grain mill

But regular readers will know that I’m also a big fan of spelt. Since we got our Nutrimill grain mill a little over a year ago, we’ve been grinding our own flours and flour mixes, and I keep a supply of whole grain spelt on hand for grinding into flour. Spelt has a sweet, nutty flavor and a nutritional profile that is hard to beat, offering up lots of fiber, protein and minerals.

whole grain spelt berries

whole grain spelt berries

Baking with spelt does require some special considerations though. The gluten in spelt is more fragile than the gluten in wheat, which makes it easy to over knead. And breads made with 100% spelt may not rise as much compared to wheat breads. That’s not an issue with most quick breads, and spelt is great in those recipes. But on the plus side, spelt flour makes doughs that are supple and easy to roll out without snapping back. This makes spelt great for pita bread and other flatbreads like pizza and foccacia.

spelt dough is easy to roll out

spelt dough is easy to roll out

So today I want to share my recipe for pita bread made with spelt flour. The actual baking procedure is the same as for my other pita recipes. I bake the dough for 2-3 minutes on a very hot preheated pizza stone. The pocket in the bread is formed by steam when the dough meets the hot stone. If you’re using it strictly as a flatbread and don’t care if the pitas puff up perfectly or not, then oven temp doesn’t matter so much.

mixing ingredients with dough whisk

mixing ingredients with dough whisk

One thing that is different with this recipe is a resting period after mixing the ingredients together, and before kneading. The rest period allows the flour to get fully hydrated, and the gluten to begin developing. I find that 100% whole grain flours, especially those freshly ground at home, can take longer than usual to absorb liquid. Without the rest period, it is sometimes necessary to add additional flour in order to work with the dough, which then causes the dough to be too dry later on. When I use the Kitchenaid mixer to do my kneading, I just mix the ingredients up in the mixer bowl using my dough whisk and then cover with foil or plastic wrap. After the rest period, it’s on to the mixer for the kneading.

pita dough ready to be rolled out

pita dough ready to be rolled out

Also, I weigh the flour and water for this recipe, and for all the bread recipes I develop myself. When you use volume measurements for flours, there is so much difference in how much flour you actually get depending on how you fill the cups, and how fluffy or dense the flour is. Weighing gives me more consistent and dependable results. You can get a good digital kitchen scale for less than $25, and it will be money well spent in my opinion. A scale is so handy that I can’t imagine baking or cooking without one.

pita pizzas topped with arugula

pita pizzas topped with arugula

This recipe can be made with either all spelt flour, or with half spelt and half unbleached flour. Either way, you may have to add a little bit of either flour or water to get the right dough consistency. The baked pitas keep for several days, or you can freeze for longer storage.

Whole Grain Spelt Pita Bread Print This Recipe Print This Recipe
A Happy Acres original

280g (1-1/4 cup) room temperature water
1 tbsp sugar
2 tsp yeast, active dry or instant
2 tbsp olive oil
400g (3-1/2 to 3-3/4 cup) whole grain spelt flour
1 tsp salt

1. Dissolve yeast and sugar in 1-1/4 cup warm water. Let sit for 5 minutes to activate yeast. (If using instant yeast, skip this step and mix all wet and dry ingredients together at the same time)
2. In a mixing bowl, combine flour, salt, yeast/water mixture and oil. Stir mixture until flour is hydrated. Let rest for 20 minutes.
3. Place dough on work surface and knead for 5 minutes, or use low speed of electric mixer to knead for aout 2-3 minutes. Add small amount of flour if necessary.
4. Place dough in bowl lightly coated with a little oil. Cover and let rise for 90 minutes, until doubled in bulk.
5. Punch dough down to release trapped gases. Divide dough into 8 balls for large pitas, or 10 balls to make smaller ones. Cover and let rest for 20 minutes. This step allows the dough to relax so it is easier to shape.
6. While dough is resting, place pizza stone or baking tiles in oven and preheat to 500F.
7. Spread light coat of flour on work surface. Place one ball of dough there and sprinkle top with flour. Use hands or rolling pin to flatten out to 1/8″ or 1/4″ thick. If dough is hard to stretch, cover and let rest another 5-10 minutes. Prepare as much dough as will fit on pizza stone at one time.
8. Open oven and place as many pitas as you can fit on the stone. Let bake for 2-3 minutes, until puffed up and as brown as desired.
9. While pitas are baking, form next batch of dough. Repeat until all dough is baked.
10. Remove pitas from oven and let cool, covered by a cloth towel. Bubbles should deflate as pitas cool. Be careful – pitas are full of hot steam when taken from the oven!

Servings: 8

Nutrition Facts
Nutrition (per serving): 231 calories, 44 calories from fat, 5g total fat, 0mg cholesterol, 293mg sodium, 60.1mg potassium, 38.5g carbohydrates, 6.4g fiber, 1.6g sugar, 6.9g protein, 2.9mg calcium, <1g saturated fat.

 

 

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3 Responses to Whole Grain Spelt Pita Bread

  1. Pingback: New Bread Machine – Zojirushi BB-CEC20 | Our Happy Acres

  2. penny king says:

    Hi. I was wondering if this recipe could be done in a bread machine on the dough setting? I have a friend who has a hard time using her hands so the kneading would be hard for her.

    • Dave says:

      Hi Penny,

      Yes, you can make this pita bread using the dough cycle of a bread machine. If you have a machine that’s programmable, you can program the ‘knead’ for about 10 minutes, and the rise for 90 minutes. Otherwise, the basic dough cycle of most bread machines should do a good job for this bread.

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